firelily:

thingsihappentolike:

Jack Tars Ahoy!! via Bluejacket

Jack Tar was a common English term used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. Both members of the public, and seafarers themselves, made use of the name in identifying those who went to sea. It was not used as an offensive term and sailors were happy to use the term to label themselves [..] Seamen were known to ‘tar’ their clothes before departing on voyages, in order to make them waterproof, before the invention of waterproof fabrics. Later they frequently wore coats and hats made from a waterproof fabric called tarpaulin. (Wikipedia)
I first heard the term “Jack Tar” in the song Saucy Sailor. I love the etymology of naval terms :)

firelily:

thingsihappentolike:

Jack Tars Ahoy!! via Bluejacket

Jack Tar was a common English term used to refer to seamen of the Merchant or Royal Navy, particularly during the period of the British Empire. Both members of the public, and seafarers themselves, made use of the name in identifying those who went to sea. It was not used as an offensive term and sailors were happy to use the term to label themselves [..] Seamen were known to ‘tar’ their clothes before departing on voyages, in order to make them waterproof, before the invention of waterproof fabrics. Later they frequently wore coats and hats made from a waterproof fabric called tarpaulin. (Wikipedia)

I first heard the term “Jack Tar” in the song Saucy Sailor. I love the etymology of naval terms :)

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